Posts Tagged ‘PO’


I’m at the Milwaukee Secure Detention Facility (MSDF), an institution in the Wisconsin Prison System (WPS), participating in the Earned Release Program (ERP). In the course of doing laundry and trying to get a break from cellie Andre Charles, I spent some time in the dayroom talking to a few guys on my unit.  First, I got to talk to a guy who is in a similar position to me in that he doesn’t have anywhere to go when he gets out after being paroled to Waukesha County.  He’s written to everyone you can think of inquiring about his situation, neatly organizing the info in a picture album you can order off canteen.  But he’s reached the same impasse as I have.  There appears to be nowhere to go except the shelter in Waukesha, WI, the Salvation Army.  His stepfather won’t allow him at their home.  But he’s come up with another plan.  He’ll get a cheap car and sleep in that since the weather will be warm when he’s released in May.  I argued it isn’t safe and the parole officer (PO) likely wouldn’t approve such a thing.  His argument back was that the PO could provide different accommodations if they didn’t like it.  I suspect the PO won’t take to such tactics.  But the desperation we both feel is pretty evident.  I even found myself thinking about this possibly that really isn’t.  Later I caught up with a guy from my ERP group, Mark Hogan.  He’s really become the class clown of our group, coming up with things to say that are really off the wall.  But he sat down with me at the table.  He’s almost 70, but is as strong as an ox, out lifting  many in the exercise room.  He has a gray Rollie Fingers type moustache and likes his gin.  He claimed to have done 4 years for his 5th offense DUI which is quite harsh so I’m a little doubtful.  Perhaps I telegraph that I’m receptive to such things, but he opened about his own experience with Post Traumatic Delayed Stress Disorder, and his time in Vietnam.  I shared part of my biological father’s experience in return.  I’m’ due to read my autobiography to the ERP group on February 11th (over 2 weeks away) so they all will know this stuff soon.  I’m a little nervous as many indicate they were very general with some indicating they flat out lied.  I’m just really nervous some will use it against me in some fashion outside the ERP group.  It’s not suppose to happen but the reality is it probably will.  Today was the first day our ERP group began reading it’s autobiographies.  But first a newcomer joined our group, an attractive Asian American woman named Nikita Cho who was a student interning under Ms. Grey, our ERP Coordinator.  After the breathing exercises and the introductions we had the first autobiography read, Larry Sands.  Sands had made it clear he wasn’t going to write a lot or be specific back in the beginning and it was pretty obvious.  So much so Ms. Grey made him sit down and write it over and called on the next guy, John Lloyd.   Lloyd had done a good job having lived a pretty normal life.  Grief over his father’s death led Ms. Grey to assign him the book Life is Goodbye Life is Hello by Alla Bozarth.  John and I sit across from each other at mealtime and during program time and we get along well.  In the afternoon session, we went over the stages of change – 1. pre-awareness, 2. Contemplation, 3. Preparation, 4. Taking Action, 5. Avoiding relapse and maintenance.  It was probably Ms. Grey’s best day that I’ve seen so far.  I’m happy to say I’ve been in 3, 4 and 5 since last January.

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I’m at the Milwaukee Secure Detention Facility (MSDF), an institution in the Wisconsin Prison System (WPS), participating in the Earned Release Program (ERP). Yesterday started out like every other breakfast.  Often we get a box of raisins with that meal.  The guy across from me at the table poured his raisins over his Frosted Flakes and on the raisins were tiny white worm like looking things.  He picked one up and put it on the table and sure enough it started squirming.  They were maggots!  I wanted to throw up.  I hadn’t opened my raisins yet and I highly doubt I’ll eat anymore while I’m here.  I’m not sure if it is on MSDF or the people that packaged them that this happened but it just doesn’t really matter.  After the moldy suncup (which I still won’t drink), warm milk and now this, I just don’t have a lot of confidence in the food here.  My cellie Andre Charles came by the table and quickly spread the word to others and soon it was the talk of the cellblock.  The rest of this particular Sunday was dominated by the soon to be crowned National Football Conference (NFC) Champions Green Bay Packers pre-game shows and football game.  Did I mention the Packers are going to the Super Bowl? Smile  Of course, Andre is a Pittsburgh Steeler fan so Super Bowl week should be interesting.  I did do one useful thing.  I made the decision to contact my biological half brother and let him know my natural father’s relatives were looking for him too.  I figured we may as well get this all over with.  The next day, began week 7 of our involvement in the ERP program.  We also are having our first phone contact with our Parole Officer (PO).  Mine is tomorrow and my PO’s name is Janet Martin (No relation to me).  She also had written my pre-sentence investigation that hadn’t been kind to me.  But more about that after the call.  As a result of the calls, we spent the entire morning in our cell.  After lunch we got into our information given to us on denial and defense mechanisms.  We each took turns reading one of the 12 mechanisms.  We got done and were promptly told to lock in.  I found out over supper what happened.  On the other side of our unit is a group who are there because they violated the terms of their parole and have what’s called an ATR or an alternative to revocation.  Once they graduate they get out instead of going back to prison.  But tonight three of those guys were transferred back to general population to await revocation.  I don’t know why.  One is facing 7 years.  All were 3 weeks away from graduation.  Spouse’s, families, and friends all were awaiting them to get out.  Plans made and hopes are sky high.  I can’t even imagine what’s going through their heads.  I  pray that I never find out.