Posts Tagged ‘differences’

I’m at the Milwaukee Secure Detention Facility (MSDF), an institution in the Wisconsin Prison System (WPS), participating in the Earned Release Program (ERP).  Our ERP social worker Ms. Grey started vacation today (Thursday, May 26th) and she won’t be back until Monday.  We have a little bit of work but really we’re keeping ourselves busy.  Cellie Jose Michaels got me turned on to a set of World Book encyclopedias from 2001 that are in the 8 x 12 room called the library.  I buried myself with Q-R.  It reminded me of when I was a kid.  When Charles and Victoria Martin adopted me and we had moved to WI.  I buried myself in encyclopedias.  Years later I had Google but encyclopedias were special.  At 3 am we had the weekly Community meeting.   Since our group is now the senior ERP group, the inmate running the meeting was my cellie Larry Sands.  He did a good job.  Again we introduced ourselves since a new ERP group just started.  For once, no complaints about hygiene were mentioned. In fact it went relatively quickly.  The big topic of conversation was about the California Supreme Court on prison overcrowding and what impact it might have here.  On Friday it was a furlough day.  Though we were supposed to be working on program materials the guard let everyone go and do their own thing.  He probably was unaware of this.  The unit manager showed up toward the end of the morning and told him we should be working on program related materials but then this guard argued back it wasn’t his job to enforce rules like that.  We figured come the afternoon session we’d be made to go back to work but that didn’t happen.  The one downside to furlough days is no mail is sent out from the previous day and no mail is given out that day.  With the Memorial Holiday coming there’ll be no mail until Tuesday.  I did get to spend some time with Les Simon who’s really struggling with the cultural differences in his cell.  It makes me grateful for my cellies.  We wear our headphones with out televisions and radios for the most part, leave the cell if we need to fart, are quiet after lights out at 11, and a general peaceful environment prevails.  Les has got noisy and inconsiderate cellies.  We did hear something interesting towards the end of Friday night.  It seems the former swamper who just graduated had talked of robbing former cellie Brian Whalen and of messing with one of the guards after his release, had not kept his curfew once since getting out and has been partying since getting out.  Most that know him here are in a mixture of awe and wondering when the other shoe will drop.  After all, he’s on the bracelet so his parole officer (PO) has got to know, or will know.  I have no desire to do what he is doing.  There is so much to do after I get out and lets face it, if I screw up there’s a pretty good chance my very life is at stake.  Saturday provided more evidence that my ERP group is suffering from the shorts,  the malady that infects inmates about to be released.  Kevin House, Scott Dietz, and Russ Johnson all had run-ins with other inmates, though in Dietz case its just another day at the office.  On Sunday John Lloyd had a run-in with a guard which was completely out of character.  That same guard, Roscoe Peters, and another guard I’d hear discussing this blog specifically the entry The Instigator.  They clearly don’t like me or what I had to say.  Then Peters saw me and quieted them.  Again, at this stage of the game, it matters not.  I spent that night watching parts I-II of a special on Milwaukee Public Television on the Korean War which was quite good.  It’s going to be a hot day tomorrow which is Memorial Day.  It should be the last holiday I’m locked up and that makes me happy!


I’m at the Fox Lake Minimum Correctional Institution (FMCI), a facility in the Wisconsin Prison System (WPS).  I had the second part of my root canal done today.  One of the differences in my trip to the dentist and your trip to the dentist is there is no idle chatter about the weather, how you are doing or your job.  I kind of prefer this actually because the dentist isn’t trying to make conversations while digging in my mouth.  I always did find that annoying.  Today’s trip was to apply filler to the enamel I guess.  The only snag was the infection he had hoped to eliminate with  antibiotics last time was still there, so he rinsed it with peroxide.  If there was a difference this time it was me.  This time I was running a low grade fever and my sinuses were plugged.  If you’ve ever gone to the dentist in such condition, it makes it suck even more.  Once he finished, he said, “All done”, and walked away.  The hygienist told me I’d be back in 2 weeks once the enamel had hardened. I returned to Unit 9 and my bunk.  I’ve spent a good part of the last 2 days there because of my touch of the flu.  If I’d had to go to work though I would have.  I’m not alone on the flu thing.  A lot of guys are running around here sniffling and such.  I am not surprised.  As you might imagine, this is a ripe environment for the spreading of the flu.  A day ago I saw a younger man at the sinks in the bathroom bent over and blowing his nose into the sink.  It took everything in me to keep from berating this person.  But prior experience has taught me that I would accomplish nothing by talking to him.  But its just another reason I can’t wait to have my own place again someday.  It’s part of being in prison, part of the penalty for my crime.  Deprivation of a basically hygienic environment is not thought of as a part of your sentence by judges, lawyers or defendants, but trust me, it should be.  But really, how could the DOC do it any differently, assuming that they’d actually want to?  Where there is a mass of people, germs will flourish.  They can’t provide things like bleach because it can be used as a weapon so the situation is what it is.  My attitude has changed since my early entries on this.  It’s just acceptance of the fact that these conditions are beyond my control and stressing on it will do no good.  Still, I recommend Howie Mandel or other germaphobes stay out of prison.  It won’t be good for their psyche.  

I’m at the Fox Lake Minimum Correctional Institution (FMCI), a facility in the Wisconsin Prison System (WPS).  One of the things I’m not going to miss about barracks life here is rather unpleasant, but its a fact.  You see, people fart!  Yes, they do.  Everyone will insist that their cellie, or bunkmate, is the worst when it comes to this.  I, of course, insist mine is.  It got so bad the other night I had to turn on my fan even though it isn’t hot out anymore.  He’s diabetic, and when he cheats, it gets real bad.  Others handle it how you would expect junior high boys to handle it, with laughter.  Competitions (just use your imagination, I’m not going to describe that!) and denials.  There’s times I wish I could act like that, all silly and what not.  It’s just not me.  I’m okay acting like that with kids but not adults.  I do it took, but being top bunk I don’t torture anyone!  At least I hope not.  So those are part of the sounds and smells of barracks life in FMCI.  As a friend of mine has pointed out, it is similar in some aspects to military life.  There are major differences.  Those in the military are there by choice and are of a higher character and purpose which affects how they conduct themselves and how they interact with others.  Here contains a sometimes subliminal, sometimes not, jockeying for position using intimidation tactics and scams. Beware those who bear gifts or seek them.  Some will be more than willing to give you things that cost them nothing, off their meal tray for example, but the tradeoff is they’ll expect to be given things you do pay for. You would think in a minimum security environment this would be less of an issue but its actually worse due to the fact that there’s less control and the inmates have more money.  Those running scams never get me because my answer is always the same.  The answer is always “no”.  Some tell me I’ve got to learn to play the game.  My response is usually along the lines of ‘why?’?  I drive these people crazy at times.

Of course, in the real world, people fart.  In the real world, lots of people are running scams.  My former step daughter, Lynn, was always up to something.  Her mother always fell for it.  I never did.  Guess what?  I drover her crazy too.  I’m trying to change, not be so suspicious all the time.  Change is only hard when you are not in control.  I’ve got to go and find a nose plug as I hear we’re having refried beans for supper.  It’s going to be a long night!